“Sexologist? Ooohh what’s that?”

Hi Readers!

So, you might have heard loads of myths about Sexologists, what we do, what we studied, where we work, how can we help, etc. 

This blog post is to help you better understand our educational background, where we work and what our ‘actual’ job is. The following explanation is mostly based on what I have learnt, my experiences, people I have studied with or have met along the way. If you have read my bio or visited my LinkedIn profile, you know that I am from Quebec, Canada and studied at the only university (UQAM) that offers this specific bachelor’s degree in North America. The Province of Quebec even has a professional order for Sexologists. If you are interested, and can read French, you can check out their website (https://opsq.org/).

Please read this post to learn more about my profession as I try to demystify some of the commonly held misconceptions about what we do. #knowledgeispower

What is a Sexologist?

A sexologist is a trained professional with either a bachelor’s, master’s or PhD in Sexology. Our education focuses on understanding a person’s sexual behaviour, development, and well-being to maintain, improve or restore sexual health whether they be an individual, a couple, a family, a group or a community. Sexual health is a state of physical, mental, and social well-being; as such, Sexology is an interdisciplinary subject. As Sexologists, we are trained to implement educational and preventative programmes across several sexual health themes. During our studies, we learn about the history of sexology, contraception, pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections (STI), HIV/AIDS, human anatomy, sexual dysfunctions, creation and evaluation of educational and preventative programmes, theoretical and practical courses on sexual health counselling and coaching. These are the subjects that help shape a Sexologist as a professional, which in turn gives us the tools to help individuals and society with sexual health issues. 

The sexologist role is to improve, maintain and restore people’s sexual health and may include the determination of an intervention plan that is implemented alone or as part of a multidisciplinary team, or in collaboration with other partners.

Where to find us

Sexologists can work in private practice, in health and social services institutions, in schools, in correctional facilities or in community settings and so many more.

So, there you have it readers! I hope this has helped you understand a little more about what a Sexologist is.

If you would like to improve, maintain, or restore your sexual health you can contact me for more details.

Be kind to one another!

Julia, Sexologist

Inclusive reads for children

Hi Readers!

I have put together a list of books covering the topics of diversity, sexuality, and inclusiveness that I think are great introductions and conversation starters. They make for great gifts for your children, nieces, nephews, students, neighbors, friends or grandchildren. And for you teachers out there, why not add these to your classroom library! If you are the person who is reading the book to the child, you will also get the benefit of learning something new and if you are just buying it for someone, maybe sneak in a cheeky read before you gift it!

The list contains 17 books about diversity, inclusivity & LGBTQ+ with a link to my affiliate amazon page. This means if you buy the book with this link, I will receive a small percentage. (No extra cost to you) This is but a small list of all the books that are out there. A lot of these books are also available on Kindle.

Ballerina Dreams by Michaela DePrince

King of the Classroom by Derrick Barnes

Wilma Rudolph: My First Wilma Rudolph by Maria Isabel Sanchez Vegara

Rosa Parks: My First Rosa Parks by Frances Lincoln

We are all welcome by Alexandra Penfold

The Proudest Blue by Ibtihaj Muhammad

Martin Luther King Jr. by Maria Isabel Sanchez Vegara

Diwali (celebrate the world) by Hannah Eliot

I am Jazz by Jessica Herthel & Jazz Jennings

“No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”

– Nelson Mandela
Here is another blog post on diversity and media

Knowledge is power. Be kind to one another!

Julia, Sexologist