WORLD AIDS DAY – DECEMBER 1st

Hi Readers!

Every year on December 1st is World AIDS Day. On this day, we remember those who have died from AIDS, we show up to support those living with HIV and we continue to raise awareness about HIV and AIDS.

The objective is to end HIV by 2030! To do this the global community will need to once again defy expectations. Achieving the funding required to end the AIDS epidemic will require renewed commitment, innovative financing and an intensified strategic focus. 

We want everyone living with HIV to have access to treatment that will extend their life expectancy and improve their health. Investments will have to be made by each country, especially those with a high diagnosis rate. 

“Continued investments will be needed to build the capacity of health and community systems to reach the ambitious goal of ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030. Importantly, quickening the pace of scaling up essential HIV treatment and prevention services will, in and of itself, result in substantial benefits to broader health systems. In addition to helping sustain the AIDS response, investments in HIV programmes will have the potential to transform national capacity to address other health priorities, such as noncommunicable diseases, maternal and child health, emerging diseases and outbreaks of infectious diseases.”UNAIDS

Reports from UNAIDS : The number of people living with HIV in 2030 could rise to 41.5 million if treatment and prevention services are kept constant at the 2013 level (current coverage). Conversely, if ambitious targets are met by 2020, the number of people living with HIV in 2030 would decline to 29.3 million. Much greater emphasis will be needed on community service delivery. According to recent consultations with countries and experts, 95% of HIV service delivery is currently facility based. 
To optimise efficiencies, UNAIDS projects that community-based service delivery will need to be ramped up to cover at least 30% of total service delivery. Not only will community service delivery reduce costs, but by bringing services closer to the people who need them, community service delivery will also improve service uptake.

To help raise awareness, in the next couple of weeks, you will find awareness videos to purchase in the shop section. These videos are great for teachers and parents who would like to raise awareness with teenagers and young adults, support group facilitators, community engagements workers please find activities related to HIV awareness on the shop page. 

Be kind to one another.

Julia, Sexologist

** We are here to help you grow. To improve, maintain and restore your sexual health.
To help keep this blog going, any contribution will be helpful. Paypal.me/juliasexologist

World Menopause Day – October 18th

Hi Readers!

If you follow Julia Sexologist on Instagram, you have already seen part of this article. I am adding the link and abstract of the White Paper the International Menopause Society published for the 2020 awareness day. Happy reading!

October 18th, 2020 is World Menopause Day. The purpose of this day is to raise awareness of menopause and the support options available for improving health & wellbeing. This year’s theme is Premature Ovarian Insufficiency (POI).

POI happens when a woman’s ovaries stop working normally before she is 40. Many women naturally experience reduced fertility when they are about 40 years old. They may start getting irregular menstrual cycles as they transition to menopause. Sometimes, it can start as early as adolescence. POI is different from premature menopause. The cause could be natural or because of a disease, surgery, chemotherapy or radiation. With POI, some women still have occasional periods. They may even get pregnant. In most instances of POI, the cause is unknown.

The International Menopause Society has publishes a White Paper. The following is the Abstract of the White Paper: 

The aim of this International Menopause Society White paper on Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is to provide the latest information regarding this distressing condition. The impact of POI has far-reaching consequences due to its impact on general, psychological and sexual quality of life, fertility prospects and long-term bone, cardiovascular and cognitive health. Progress in fully understanding the etiology, diagnosis and optimal management options has been slow thus far due to the complexity of the condition and fragmented research. Recent advances in epidemiological and genetic research have improved our understanding of this condition and randomized prospective trials are being planned to determine the intervention strategies, which will optimize quality of life and long-term well- being. The International Menopause Society has commissioned a number of experts at the forefront of their specialty to define the state of the art in the understanding of this condition, to advise on practical management strategies and to propose future research strategies. It is hoped that a global task force will subsequently be convened in order to formulate a consensus statement across key societies, to accelerate date collection and analysis of a global POI registry, and to facilitate progress in the key defined areas of research.

Read more here.

For more information on World Menopause Day, visit https://www.imsociety.org/index.php 

Be kind to one another!

Julia, Sexologist

Julia, Sexologist Blog

We are here to help you grow. To improve, maintain and restore your sexual health. To help keep this blog going, any contribution will be helpful.

5.00 £

Gender Identity

Hi Readers!

Happy Monday! It’s great to be back on this platform. Today we are learning about gender identity! Let’s begin!

Gender Identity is a person’s internal sense or feeling of being male or female. This feeling may not be the same as one’s biological sex. To understand gender identity, you need to understand the difference between the terms sex and gender.

Gender is what you feel you belong to and may differ from the one you were assigned to at birth, based on your genitals.

Sex is about the genital and reproductive organs (penis, vagina, uterus, testicles, etc.), it is about the secondary sexual characteristics such as breasts, beard, hips, etc., it is the distinction between female and male.

By contrast, gender is the pronoun you use to speak to a person (him/her, he/she), it is the different social codes like the appearance, clothes, makeup, etc., it is the distinction between feminine and masculine.

Unfortunately, these terms are very rigid and binary. To be able to include and represent all of the diversity of gender identities, sexes and gender expression, we need to look at this in a more fluid way. Think of it as a horizontal ladder that represents diversity and so much more than just two options. Below we will look at gender identity, sex and gender expression. The words below are used to facilitate the reading. You can be anywhere on any of the ladders simultaneously as these 3 terms are mutually exclusive. If you do the exercise now and put a dot on every line where you are situated today, it may not be the same answer in a few days or months. Some individuals have a different response every day.

Gender identity

Woman                                                 Gender fluid                                           Man

Sex

Female                                                    Intersex                                             Male

Gender expression

Feminine                                               Non-binary                                  Masculine

There is an entire vocabulary to describe gender identity – let’s look at a few:

  • Bigender: Someone who identifies with two genders i.e.: male and female.
  • Cisgender or cis: When your gender matches the sex you were assigned at birth.
  • Gender fluid: when your identity moves around on the gender spectrum
  • Gender neutral: someone who doesn’t identify with any gender
  • Gender non-binary: Someone who doesn’t fit into the binary gender (male/female)
  • Gender fluid: When your identity moves around the gender spectrum. 
  • Gender expression: The way in which a person’s expresses their gender identity, typically through appearance, dress, and behaviour. 
  • Intersex: People whose biology doesn’t easily fit into male or female. This can include genitals, chromosomes or hormones. 
  • Polygender: describes people who have multiple genders at once. 
  • Transgender: A person whose gender identity, outward appearance, expression and/or anatomy does not fit into conventional expectations of male or female. 
  • Transsexual: An old fashioned term for someone who goes through, or wants to go through, gender realignment. This is why we use the word Trans* as it an umbrella term to describe people whose gender identity doesn’t line up with their assigned sex at birth. Also, if someone tells you they are a woman and would like you to use the pronoun she/her and her preferred name is ____. Respect that please. That person will really appreciate the fact that you are respecting their wish and you are not judging them.
  • Two-spirit: some Aboriginal people identify themselves as two-spirit rather than as bisexual, gay, lesbian or transgender. Historically, in many Aboriginal cultures, two-spirit persons were respected leaders and medicine people. Before colonization, two-spirit persons were often accorded special status based upon their unique abilities to understand both male and female perspective (Public Health Agency of Canada, 2011). 

I hope this has helped you understand some of the different terms that are out there and helped your mind to grow a little …. If you have any questions please contact me on depetrillojulia@gmail.com

Be kind to one another!

Julia, Sexologist

Julia, Sexologist Blog

We are here to help you grow. To improve, maintain and restore your sexual health. To help keep this blog going, any contribution will be helpful.

£5.00

Inclusive reads for children

Hi Readers!

I have put together a list of books covering the topics of diversity, sexuality, and inclusiveness that I think are great introductions and conversation starters. They make for great gifts for your children, nieces, nephews, students, neighbors, friends or grandchildren. And for you teachers out there, why not add these to your classroom library! If you are the person who is reading the book to the child, you will also get the benefit of learning something new and if you are just buying it for someone, maybe sneak in a cheeky read before you gift it!

The list contains 17 books about diversity, inclusivity & LGBTQ+ with a link to my affiliate amazon page. This means if you buy the book with this link, I will receive a small percentage. (No extra cost to you) This is but a small list of all the books that are out there. A lot of these books are also available on Kindle.

Ballerina Dreams by Michaela DePrince

King of the Classroom by Derrick Barnes

Wilma Rudolph: My First Wilma Rudolph by Maria Isabel Sanchez Vegara

Rosa Parks: My First Rosa Parks by Frances Lincoln

We are all welcome by Alexandra Penfold

The Proudest Blue by Ibtihaj Muhammad

Martin Luther King Jr. by Maria Isabel Sanchez Vegara

Diwali (celebrate the world) by Hannah Eliot

I am Jazz by Jessica Herthel & Jazz Jennings

“No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”

– Nelson Mandela

Knowledge is power. Be kind to one another!

Julia, Sexologist